Topical steroid cream pregnancy

Corticosteroids are generally teratogenic in laboratory animals when administered systemically at relatively low dosage levels. The more potent corticosteroids have been shown to be teratogenic after dermal application in laboratory animals. There are no adequate and well controlled studies in pregnant women on teratogenic effects from topically applied corticosteroids. Therefore, topical corticosteroids should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. Drugs of this class should not be used extensively on pregnant patients, in large amounts, or for prolonged periods of time.

Transdermal patches can be a very precise time released method of delivering a drug. Cutting a patch in half might affect the dose delivered. The release of the active component from a transdermal delivery system (patch) may be controlled by diffusion through the adhesive which covers the whole patch, by diffusion through a membrane which may only have adhesive on the patch rim or drug release may be controlled by release from a polymer matrix. Cutting a patch might cause rapid dehydration of the base of the medicine and affect the rate of diffusion.

Of approximately 3000 patients included in clinical studies of % HALOG CREAM (halcinonide cream) , 14% were 60 years or older, while 4% were 70 years or older. No overall differences in safety were observed between these patients and younger patients. Efficacy data have not been evaluated for differences between elderly and younger patients. Other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients, but greater sensitivity of some older individuals cannot be ruled out.

Janelle Norman, Topical Steroid Withdrawl Janelle Norman, Topical Steroid Withdrawl

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Pathologic phimosis is a common problem throughout the world. In Europe, Asia, South America, and Central America neonatal circumcision is not routinely performed, thus childhood phimosis is not rare. In addition, in the United States and Canada the rates of neonatal circumcision, estimated to be 60% to 90%, 5 are declining. 9 Thus, even in the United States and Canada, phimosis is a commonly faced problem. Obviously, one of the difficulties that arises when studying phimosis is the lack of a clear definition and differentiation between a pathologic phimosis and a physiologic nonretractile foreskin. 10 In our study, nonretractable and pinpoint prepuces correspond to type II and type I of the classification by Kayaba et al. 11 The cases classified as ''retractable'' phimosis might not be considered pathologic by others because of a potential for spontaneous resolution with increasing age. However, all patients included in our study were originally referred for circumcision, they all had a constrictive ring for which they had sought medical attention, and they would have been considered candidates for circumcision if topical therapy had not been offered. [CIRP note: These doctors show the common inability to distinguish between normal in childhood developmentally narrow foreskin and a pathological condition called phimosis.]

Topical steroid cream pregnancy

topical steroid cream pregnancy

Janelle Norman, Topical Steroid Withdrawl Janelle Norman, Topical Steroid Withdrawl

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