Steroid-induced tumor lysis syndrome

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Dermatological vascular laser (single wavelength) or intense pulsed light (broad spectrum) machines offer one of the treatments for rosacea, in particular the erythema (redness) of the skin. [29] They use light to penetrate the epidermis to target the capillaries in the dermis layer of the skin. The light is absorbed by oxy hemoglobin , which heats up, causing the capillary walls to heat up to 70 °C (158 °F), damaging them, and causing them to be absorbed by the body's natural defense mechanism. With a sufficient number of treatments, this method may even eliminate the redness altogether, though additional periodic treatments will likely be necessary to remove newly formed capillaries. [23]

Steroid-induced tumor lysis syndrome

steroid-induced tumor lysis syndrome

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