Avascular necrosis of the hip steroids

Prednisone is a drug that belongs to the corticosteroid drug class, and is an anti-inflammatory and immune system suppressant. It's used to treat a variety of diseases and conditions, for example: inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis), lupus, asthma, cancers, and several types of arthritis.

Common side effects are weight gain, headache, fluid retention, and muscle weakness. Other effects and adverse events include glaucoma, cataracts, obesity, facial hair growth, moon face, and growth retardation in children. This medicine also causes psychiatric problems, for example: depression, insomnia, mood swings, personality changes, and psychotic behavior. Serious side effects include reactions to diabetes drugs, infections, and necrosis of the hips and joints.

Corticosteroids like prednisone, have many drug interactions; examples include: estrogens, phenytoin (Dilantin), diuretics, warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven), and diabetes drugs. Prednisone is available as tablets of 1, , 10, 20, and 50 mg; extended release tablets of 1, 2, and 5mg; and oral solution of 5mg/5ml. It's use during the first trimester of pregnancy may cause cleft palate. This medicine is secreted in breast milk and can cause side effects in infants who are nursing. You should not stop taking prednisone abruptly because it can cause withdrawal symptoms and adrenal failure. Talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other medical professional if you have questions about beta-blockers. Talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other medical professional if you have questions about prednisone.

If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. In the US -Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

The amount of disability that results from avascular necrosis depends on what part of the bone is affected, how large an area is involved, and how effectively the bone rebuilds itself. The process of bone rebuilding takes place after an injury as well as during normal growth. [15] Normally, bone continuously breaks down and rebuilds—old bone is resorbed and replaced with new bone. The process keeps the skeleton strong and helps it to maintain a balance of minerals. [15] In the course of avascular necrosis, however, the healing process is usually ineffective and the bone tissues break down faster than the body can repair them. If left untreated, the disease progresses, the bone collapses, [21] and the joint surface breaks down, leading to pain and arthritis. [1]

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AVN begins as a painless bone abnormality and it can remain painless. In its early stages, AVN typically has no symptoms; however, as the disease progresses, it becomes painful. Initially, patients may experience pain when pressure is applied to the affected bone. Eventually, the pain becomes persistent. If the disease progresses, the bone and surrounding joint collapse, leading the patient to experience severe pain that interferes with joint function. For instance, if a hip joint develops AVN in the ball of the hip joint, pain can be noted, especially upon weight-bearing. As the ball of the hip joint collapses from the degeneration of the bone from aseptic necrosis, pain in the groin can be felt with hip rotation, and pain can sometimes be noted with rest after weight-bearing. AVN of the knee is often associated with pain or limping with walking. The time between the first symptoms and collapse of the bone may range from several months to more than a year.

Avascular necrosis of the hip steroids

avascular necrosis of the hip steroids

AVN begins as a painless bone abnormality and it can remain painless. In its early stages, AVN typically has no symptoms; however, as the disease progresses, it becomes painful. Initially, patients may experience pain when pressure is applied to the affected bone. Eventually, the pain becomes persistent. If the disease progresses, the bone and surrounding joint collapse, leading the patient to experience severe pain that interferes with joint function. For instance, if a hip joint develops AVN in the ball of the hip joint, pain can be noted, especially upon weight-bearing. As the ball of the hip joint collapses from the degeneration of the bone from aseptic necrosis, pain in the groin can be felt with hip rotation, and pain can sometimes be noted with rest after weight-bearing. AVN of the knee is often associated with pain or limping with walking. The time between the first symptoms and collapse of the bone may range from several months to more than a year.

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