12 players suspended for steroids

First of all, due process and “allegedly” absolutely apply, but I think that comments are mostly understood to mean “if they are guilty”. Secondly, the astonishingly brazen (or incredibly stupid) modus operandi of transferring stolen funds to ONE’S OWN DEBIT ACCOUNT, or ordering and having food delivered to ONE’S OWN ADDRESS, or paying ONE’S OWN RENT, is just amazing. It will be interesting to learn how the defense intends to support any assertion of “not guilty”. Excuses for youth, associates, or socio-economics simply don’t wash. Were that the case, these guys ALL got at least a second chance when they signed with the Gators, and in most cases probably at least a third. Rather, I think this pertains to the sense of entitlement and perpetual pampering and excuses that star athletes are accorded these days. With recruiters looking at them as early as middle school, if not sooner, and years of being treated as young gods, many of these guys (by no means all, or even the majority) believe they are above the law and that the rules don’t apply to them. So many of their transgressions are overlooked or downplayed (Callaway) that they just keep spiraling downward. All the “chances” do most of them no favors. They learn they can get away with much, and soon come to believe they can get away with it all. The NFL is packed with their role models who got away with most everything in college, and are now multi-millionaires. This only changes if we, as a society recognize and reward the real heroes – teachers, first-responders, soldiers, social workers… So, the prospects for change are not encouraging. Regardless, absolve the innocent, prove the guilty, and don’t let these guys steal the spotlight from the good guys and gals that represent Gator Nation.

In January 2004, Major League Baseball announced a new drug policy which originally included random, offseason testing and 10-day suspensions for first-time offenders, 30-days for second-time offenders, 60-days for third-time offenders, and one year for fourth-time offenders, all without pay, in an effort to curtail performance-enhancing drug use (PED) in professional baseball. This policy strengthened baseball's pre-existing ban on controlled substances , including steroids, which has been in effect since 1991. [1] The policy was to be reviewed in 2008, but under pressure from the . Congress , on November 15, 2005, players and owners agreed to tougher penalties; a 50-game suspension for a first offense, a 100-game suspension for a second, and a lifetime ban for a third.

12 players suspended for steroids

12 players suspended for steroids

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12 players suspended for steroids12 players suspended for steroids12 players suspended for steroids12 players suspended for steroids12 players suspended for steroids